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Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2016 10:54 am
by bobappleton
This a track from Isaac DelPozo's first CD – CYCLE.
It's based on mathematical formulae derived from the LCC.

A Very Altered Cherry - Isaac Del Pozo
https://www.dropbox.com/s/dttyqzgmdqt4pho/A%20VERY%20ALTERED%20CHERRY.mp3?dl=0

He calls this Super Lydian

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2016 12:08 pm
by bobappleton
So I think this is some of the most interesting work I've seen (heard) on the Concept.
What do you think of this music people???

Bob

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 1:46 pm
by chespernevins
Sounds good to me!

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 12:32 pm
by isaacdelpozo
Hello to everyone,

Questions are good!


Isaac


:mrgreen:

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2016 1:06 pm
by bobappleton
My question exactly - So Isaac. What is Super Lydian? And how does it apply to your composition A Very Altered Cherry for example ??

bob

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 11:49 am
by bobappleton
Sal, I know that Isaac just moved to a place where he has limited internet. Thanks opning the discussion... Helk be back to us soon...

b

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 1:03 pm
by bobappleton
I think it could be either :)

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 2:34 pm
by bobappleton
ok

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 4:17 pm
by dogbite
[quote="SalKur"]"super lydian' if these are your words, what does it mean?[/quote]

i use "superlydian" to describe lydian augmented, the logic being that if superlocrian is the flattest mode of the melodic minor one tone flat from locrian, then "superlydian" is the sharpest mode from melodic minor, one tone sharp from lydian. i would not presume to speak for isaac in any event, but perhaps this is what he meant...

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 4:59 pm
by bobappleton
:)

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 6:37 am
by isaacdelpozo
Hello to everyone,

The harmony of A very altered Cherry is al lydian chords.

You can use either the lydian mode of each chord or the lydian augmented mode also called "superlydian".

All this harmony moves in a modal fashion without dominant motion.

The principle of tonal gravity explains that there is no need to have tension in the chords , cause they move in a natural way due to the exponential geometry of the chromatic scale.


Isaac

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 6:46 am
by isaacdelpozo
I hope that the original helps!

I upload the piano part and the solos harmony.


Isaac

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 6:50 am
by isaacdelpozo
LEAD SHEET- A very altered cherry


Isaac

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 8:38 am
by bobappleton
Hey thanks Isaac - look forward to checking that out on my piano...

b

Re: Math and the LCC - with an example

PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2016 10:30 am
by isaacdelpozo
Hello salkur,

The composition is thought in an open key ( there´s no main tonality).
I don´t understand the meaning of "playground swing".

Mathematics define all chords as sum´s of sinusoidal signals and the scales describe ( when tempered) an exponential curve, so answering to your question this is the role that they play.

Lydian chords also can move anywhere, you can try the following progressions on the keyboard:

FLYD/GLYD/ALYD/GLYD/ ( ballad feel)

FLYD/ABLYD/DBLYD/GBLYD/ (random feel)

So it´s proven that they move ANYWHERE. In non-functional music there is no need to have a harmonic justification.

I can upload something about the algebraic characteristics of the lydian scale if the forum is interested.


Isaac