The Human Side...

The main body of the LCC and its practical application, including all 4 published versions of Book 1 with their inserts: the 1959 tan cover; the 1959 light green cover Japanese edition; the 1970‘s white cover, which adds an illustrated River Trip to the 1959 edition, and the currently available Fourth Edition, 2001.

The authorization code is the first word on Page 198 of the Fourth Edition of the LCCTO.

Moderators: bobappleton, sandywilliams

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An open letter from Alice Russell. June 21, 2011, Brookline, Massachusetts. 1. DO NOT make insulting, mean spirited remarks about anyone or their work; there are a plethora of sites where you can rant unfettered. If you attack someone personally, your comments will be removed. You can post it, but I'm not paying for it. Go elsewhere, and let those artists who are actually interested in discussion and learning have the floor. 2. There will be NO posting of or links to copyrighted material without permission of the copyright owner. That's the law. And if you respect the work of people who make meaningful contributions, you should have no problem following this policy. 3. I appreciate many of the postings from so many of you. Please don't feel you have to spend your time "defending" the LCC to those who come here with the express purpose of disproving it. George worked for decades to disprove it himself; if you know his music, there's no question that it has gravity. And a final word: George was famous for his refusal to lower his standards in all areas of his life, no matter the cost. He twice refused concerts of his music at Lincoln Center Jazz because of their early position on what was authentically jazz. So save any speculation about the level of him as an artist and a man. The quotes on our websites were not written by George; they were written by critics/writers/scholars/fans over many years. Sincerely, Alice

Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:27 am

thanks for these thoughts and sounds

and here's the simple honesty which is such pure soul

http://www.4shared.com/file/49700160/ab ... erman.html

b
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Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 11:40 am

You know this music so well... thanks again for these... and for always re-introducing the human element when we may seem to have forgotten it.

In "Celebrating Bird" Roy Porter says... "it was the most catastropic recording session... Bird was reall ill" then he stops for a minute and adds "... but if you listen to loverman... nothin' but soul"

Great artists posess this quality of imbuing their work with the passion of the heart.

For anyone who hasn't seen this movie, it's here: http://video.google.ca/videosearch?q=ce ... =N&tab=wv#

And PS: It wasn't easy to find a few bars of Parker without complex runs. Sometimes people may not hear the feeling for the speed. But they're both present in equal measure - I think.

b
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Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 11:56 am

i remember seeing george coleman in ny. can't remember the name of the club, but you went downstairs and it was one of those long bars, and he was at the bottom of the stairs as i entered. he was tuning up and he played a long... very long... low note on tenor. it was just "his sound". and from that moment even after the gig was over i could remember (and still do) the sound of that horn - which seemed to encapsulate everything i ever heard him do on record with miles davis and the quintet.

maybe this is just an artists view of music. but i think i could imagine the same thing for a lot of musicians: one note of miles, one of dolphy, one of coltrane... rollins...
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Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 12:51 pm

yeah... you're so right.

my new teacher is an old friend (who i played with when i was a drummer).

like you, he's a sax player.

and he's got me transcribing now... arrrrgghhhh.

but it's good for my "soul".
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Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 1:15 pm

do you happen to have loverman - or just the bridge - as a midi file which i could put into sibelius? then i could slow it down and "hear" it...
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Postby bobappleton » Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:29 pm

that works. thanks...
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Postby dogbite » Wed Jun 04, 2008 2:57 am

dogbite has recently recovered from some serious computer virus issues and is therefore late to the conversation. since loverman is one of the first jazz tunes i ever learned, i am curious about the context of the tune in this dialog. the aebersold "ballads" (volume 32 is it?) play-along is where i first heard it and of course this collection has a lovely arrangement of lush life, which is my all-time favorite chart to read and play...

i play loverman in F and have never bought into the "play everything in all keys" admonition; therefore, if someone calls the tune in a different key, i become most unhappy. how much should i beat myself up over this?

s/aka/db

12.5% Norwegian
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Postby bobappleton » Wed Jun 04, 2008 7:53 pm

thank you for this...

the art of anguish. that's what we hear in loverman... the unfathomable ruthlessness that we know exists today as it did then. we recognize it because we've felt it too.

that new york recording is so beautiful in a whole other way than the california session. what is the session called? is it still part of the recordings for dial?
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Postby bobappleton » Thu Jun 05, 2008 12:29 pm

was this ever released outside of the verve compilation? if there were more tracks from that day, it would make sense to hear them together.
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Postby bobappleton » Sat Jun 28, 2008 6:48 am

last night in toronto: i saw another "parker" - evan. in his long-time trio with barry guy and paul lytton

wow!

is what someone said afterwards. and it's hard to beat that comment. i used to see these guys in london when i was an art student in the mid-70's. they're even faster than they were then, no less exciting, and beating in tune like a human heart.

hearing/seeing music at that level is like going to the therapist and discovering some untapped thread of consciousness still alive in your self.

bird lives!
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Postby bobappleton » Sat Jun 28, 2008 5:26 pm

i just got back from the workshop evan parker and paul lytton gave in toronto's music gallery this afternoon... barry guy was there for a while too.

it was very interesting. and i can report that there's an active and good free improvisation scene here.

i asked evan if anyone in the field has attempted to write a literal or philosophical notation of the new sounds created in this music. he replied: "just because you can write it down, doesn't mean anyone can play it." and as our conversation went on i realized that free improv may be one of the few remaining musics where the aural/oral tradition is completely alive - and the music itself (aside from recordings, which are pale immitations of the real thing) dies with each creator.

b

ps: one beautiful piece they did last night sounded enough like "train and the river" to be a tribute to jimmy giuffre - who they mentioned as an influence today. however as paul lytton said "it wasn't through any intention on my part - the music changes with every listener"
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